Bill McEvoy

Bill McEvoy is Master Chef/DBA for the Cooking with SQL Web site. He's been a DBA since SQL Server 4.2, and he specializes in batch processing and performance tuning.

Articles by Bill McEvoy
T-SQL 101: Stored Procedures 1
The final lesson in the T-SQL 101 series shows you how to create and execute stored procedures that get data into and out of databases.
T-SQL 101: Built-In Functions
T-SQL offers three types of built-in functions, including scalar functions. Scalar functions let you perform a wide variety of operations, such as retrieving dates and replacing strings, with only a few lines of code.
T-SQL 101: The CASE Function 1
Using T-SQL's CASE function, you can quickly transform numerical codes and other hard-to-decipher data into meaningful information.
Q: How do I retrieve values from a table and store the results in a string?
Learn how to retrieve values from a table and store the results.
T-SQL 101: Views 3
The virtual nature of a view is its greatest strength and its greatest weakness. Here's what you need to know to create views and use them wisely.
Indexed Views vs. Regular Views
Learn how indexed views differ from regular views.
T-SQL 101, Lesson 6
Creating a table "the old fashioned way" leads to a better understanding of the table and its columns. Plus, the resulting T-SQL code documents the table's structure and lets you easily recreate the table.
T-SQL 101, Lesson 5 1
Understand the differences between inner, outer, and cross joins before you use them in your queries.
T-SQL 101, Lesson 4
Thanks to the GROUP BY clause, you can write SELECT queries that produce detailed reports.
T-SQL 101, Lesson 3
SELECT queries aren't just for retrieving data. You can also summarize that data by incorporating COUNT, MIN, MAX, AVG, and SUM functions into SELECT queries.
Take the Drudgery Out of Making Sure Your Databases Are Being Backed Up Properly 2
Ensuring that databases are being backed up properly is an important but time-consuming task, especially for DBAs who manage multiple servers and databases. The sp_ShowBackups stored procedure makes this task quick and easy.
2 Stored Procedures to Tune Your Indexes 2
If you have to perform a full index analysis, here are two T-SQL stored procedures you can use to get detailed information about the indexes in a single table or an entire database.
T-SQL 101, Lesson 2 1
Using a database named MyDB, a table named MyTable, and some dummy tables, you can learn how to create T-SQL queries that insert new data, update existing data, and delete old data.
T-SQL 101, Lesson 1 6
Whether you are new to T-SQL or you just want to brush up on the basics, you'll want to read and save this guide that walks you through how to write SELECT statements. Learn how to order and rename columns and how to filter and sort results.
Stored Procedure Documents Scheduled Jobs in SQL Server 6
Using SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) to document job schedules involves a lot of mouse-clicking and cutting and pasting. You can avoid all that hassle by using the sp_ShowJobSchedules stored procedure.
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