Chandra Sekhar Pathivada

Chandra Sekhar
Pathivada

Chandra Sekhar Pathivada is an independent consultant based in San Francisco. An MCST in SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2000, he specializes in developing and administering SQL Server database servers. He hosts the www.calsql.com website to help fellow DBAs and the SQL Server user community.

Articles
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Revisiting How to Avoid Referential Integrity Errors
In this updated version of "Avoid Referential Integrity Errors When Deleting Records from Databases," Chandra Sekhar Pathivada goes more in-depth into the concepts behind his PR_HIERARCHIAL_DATA stored procedure.
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Avoid Referential Integrity Errors When Deleting Records from Databases 8
Deleting all the records in a database can be tricky when it includes tables with foreign keys. Here's a script you can use if you have ALTER TABLE permission and a stored procedure you can use if you don't.

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From the Blogs
Apr 21, 2016
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Turning Global Addresses into your Biggest Asset

Sponsored Blog Are you dealing with national and international records? The more expansive your records are in territory, the more problems you will face when it comes to verifying addresses. Not only are you dealing with language differences, but you are also dealing with different address formatting for different countries....More
Mar 14, 2016
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Building Your Business with Quality Data

Your contact data is valuable, but is it up to its full potential? Without the proper maintenance, the quality of your data quickly decreases--so quickly that 50% of databases deteriorate after only two years. It is an absolute necessity to maintain your data in order to decrease costs and increase profits....More
Feb 12, 2016
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Your Data’s Rate of Decay

Did you know that data has a half-life? That is the amount of time it takes for the information in your database to go bad. How? Because contact data is always changing....More
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