Greg Low

Greg
Low
CEO,
SQL Down Under

Dr. Greg Low is an internationally recognized consultant, trainer and author. He is a SQL Server MVP and a Microsoft Regional Director for Australia. Greg holds a PhD in computer science and is a Microsoft Certified Master for SQL Server. He is the author of a number of Microsoft white papers and is a sought-after presenter. Based in Melbourne, Dr. Low is the CEO of SQL Down Under and is well known for his SQL Down Under podcasts on SQL Server topics. Read his blog here.

Articles
DATA TALES #8: The Case of the Database Diet (Part 3)

This is the 3rd article in a series on a database that needed to go on a diet for the new year.

Data Tales 7: The Case of the Database Diet Part 2
This month, we’ll start by looking at how ROW compression actually works, then look at the greater savings from PAGE compression. We’ll also look at how it works internally.
Data Tales: The Case of the Database Diet (Part 1)
DATA TALES #6: The Case of the Database Diet (Part 1) (in which Dr. Greg Low begins his plans of placing a VLDB on a diet...
Data Tales #5: The Case of the Rogue Index 2

It can be painful to see performance problems caused by poor or inappropriate indexing choices without the ability to make strategic indexing changes. In some cases you can though...

Data Tales #4: The Case of the Phantom Duplicate 1
Our intrepid DBA is attempting to enter a new value into a table and is getting an error due to violation of a unique constraint even though the value does not yet exist in the table. What could possibly be causing this?
Data Tales #3: The Case of the Stubborn Log File
The transaction log continues to grow despite regular backups. Diagnosing the issue and preventing it from happening again is what this case is all about.
Data Tales #2: The Case of the Exploding Table 1

I was recently at a customer site where the developers were very concerned about the impact of adding columns to a table. They told me that when they added a new column that their deployment code was timing out and the database was massively increasing in size. It had increased from around a small size to well over 50GB during the single operation. The deployment operation involved adding the column and writing one row to a deployment history table. Because they were only writing a single new row, they were blaming SQL Server for bloating the database size when a column was added.

Data Tales #1: The Case of the Auto-Truncating Table

I have a number of clients that I spend a day or two with each month. I like this style of engagement as I get to know the staff and their systems over a period of time, can see the improvements that we make over time. The staff members also know that if they have issues that aren't desperate, they can save them up for the days that I am onsite. When I arrived at one of these customer sites recently, several of the staff members had grins on their faces, and one told me that Terry (well let's call him Terry anyway) had really broken something.

Configuring SQL Server 2008’s Resource Governor 1
Prevent database performance problems by using Resource Governor to control the CPU and memory allocated to applications.

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