Kimberly L. Tripp

Kimberly L. Tripp has been working with SQL Server since 1990, and she’s worked as a consultant, trainer, speaker, and writer specializing in core SQL Server performance tuning and availability since 1995.

Articles by Kimberly L. Tripp
Using the newsequentialid() GUID Function
In SQL Server 2005, you can use a new GUID function called newsequentialid() to populate your uniqueidentifer column.
Essential Aspects of Database Design 4
What's important to consider in designing a database? For optimal performance, you need to be mindful about three interrelated factors: indexing, maintenance, and statistics. Here's some advice to get you started in the planning process.
Database Design for Performance 3
In a database performance-engineering process, applying the right design techniques will ensure smooth-running operations. Here’s a laundry list of essential technical items you need to include in your process.
An Ounce of Prevention
Yes, you need to plan well for disaster recovery, but consider spending as much time on disaster prevention and minimization.
Recovering from Isolated Corruption
When disaster strikes only a subset of data, take the easiest route to recovery. Why undertake a full database restoration if faster recovery options are available?
The Best Place for Bulk_Logged
If your environment can’t afford data loss, your safest bet is to use the Full database recovery model as your primary recovery model and control changes through Bulk_Logged.
Detailed Aggregates 2
When you want more than just the summary data that GROUP BY can give, using COMPUTE and COMPUTE BY is the best way to get the details and aggregates.
Viewer Advisory
Learn what you can and can't do with SQL Server views, and a few tips on better viewing habits.
The View from Here 2
Part one in a series of articles that explain everything you need to know about using views and achieving the best query performance with them.
T-SQL Tutor Project, December 2002
Here's a small homework assignment to help you create and access views.
Simplify, Parameterize, Reuse 1
Until the advent of SQL Server 2000, if you wanted to encapsulate a simple expression, you had to hard-code it in a view. Now you can use a UDF to encapsulate the expression and reuse it. Flexibility is the key.
T-SQL Tutor Project - 01 Oct 2002
This homework assignment can help you further improve your ability to write scalar UDFs.
Datetime for Durable Databases 1
Developers can use the tools in SQL Server 7.0 and earlier releases to script datetime data for storage in existing databases, but the scalar UDF introduced in SQL Server 2000 is more flexible, efficient, and user friendly.
T-SQL Tutor Project, September 2002
For this homework assignment, try your hand at creating a UDF that returns datetime data in a specified format.
Restoring After Isolated Disk Failure 1
Using the file and filegroup backup strategy can help you quickly and easily recover from isolated failures.
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