Blogs seem to be popping up like mushrooms lately, and so far I did
not maintain one of my own. Not that I don’t see the value in
blogging; it’s just that I always thought that maintaining a blog
requires a commitment—one that I was not ready to make so far.
But apparently it’s inevitable. :) I’ve been getting requests to start
blogging, and decided to give it a try.

What should you expect?

Frankly I’m not completely sure yet; but I hope that the blog will be
like an open book where both myself and the blog visitors have a say.
Of course I plan to cover technical issues, but I’d also like it to be
somewhat informal and personal, and I’d be glad to get as many
comments as possible so that I can know what you’re interested in.
Some ideas that I have in mind for now…
I love puzzles, so occasionally I’ll post T-SQL challenges, and with
the courtesy of SQL Server Magazine and MSPress we will give
away prizes in the form of books and SQL Server Magazine
subscriptions.
I’ll post tips, advice and technical discoveries related to SQL and
logic. I’m thinking of moving the logic puzzles from the print magazine
to the blog. This will free up space in my column for T-SQL
coverage, and will also allow more interaction.
In hope that some non-technical items will not bore you to death, I’ll
also cover some of my experiences that have something to do with
SQL, or with people that do SQL.
For example, I’ll talk about a 70 miles hike that we’re planning late
august with some SQL folks; experiences from my travels, conferences and
so on.

Being very fond of logic, I hope that the blog will be thought-provoking. And
for starters, I’ll let you ponder on some thought-provoking sentence I heard
from my good friend Dejan Sarka over several beers in a pub in Vienna. The
sentence was coined by the Russian author Venedikt Erofeev, and we were
working on it in the pub and several days later to try and decipher it:

“There is no difference except the difference in level between different
levels and non-differences”

Cheers. :)

--
BG