SQL Server Magazine UPDATE—brought to you by SQL Server Magazine and SQL Server Magazine Connections


THIS ISSUE SPONSORED BY

SQL Web Seminar—SQL Server Backup and Recovery

What's New in SQL Server 2005?
(Below COMMENTARY)


April 1, 2004—In this issue:

1. SQL Server Perspectives

  • SQL Server 2005: Late but Loaded

2. News and Views

  • Have Lunch with SQL Server Magazine
  • Microsoft Fixes Access-Violation Exception
  • Hotfixes Available for T-SQL Errors
  • Results of Previous Instant Poll: Active Directory
  • New Instant Poll: SQL Server Experience

3. Announcements

  • SQL Server Experts, Tips, & Content
  • SQL Server Magazine Connections: Win a Harley

4. Resources

  • What's New in SQL Server Magazine: The Java Connection
  • Hot Thread: Logon Failures in Reporting Services
  • Tip: Installing SQL Server 2000 on Windows Server 2003

5. Events Central

  • Meta-Data/DAMA Conference, Los Angeles, May 2-6
  • SQL Web Seminar—Writing and Debugging Great Stored Procedures

6. New and Improved

  • Quickly Create Reports in Multiple Formats
  • Create a Web Interface for Your SQL Server Database

Sponsor: SQL Web Seminar—SQL Server Backup and Recovery

These days, data availability is crucial for business service. It is important to have the processes and technology in place to reduce the risk of data outages and to recover quickly in the event of a failure. Sign up today for a free, one-hour Web seminar on April 29, sponsored by BMC Software. You will learn about the relevant and executable database Backup and Recovery best practices that are used to minimize the impact of database outages and protect business services that are dependent on data. Register now and get a free SQL-BackTrack License. Click here:
     http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BGxu0AJ


1. SQL Server Perspectives

  • SQL Server 2005: Late but Loaded

  • (contributed by Brian Moran, news editor)

    Two weeks ago, I wrote about the delay of SQL Server 2005, formerly code-named Yukon (see "Yukon Delays"). Microsoft has pushed back commercial availability of SQL Server 2005 to the first half of 2005, presumably closer to June than January. In my earlier article, I asked you to share what effect SQL Server 2005's delay might have on you and your organization. This week, I summarize the responses many of you sent me and share some of my thoughts about the delay.

    Most readers who sent their responses said the delay won't be a major problem. Many of you prefer waiting to getting a release plagued with significant bugs. Readers noted that SQL Server 2000 has made great strides in gaining enterprise acceptance. However, if customers had to wait to deploy SQL Server 2005 until Service Pack 1 (SP1) fixed major problems in the release, the effect on the perception of SQL Server as a quality product would be disastrous. "The delay is a confidence booster for us," one reader noted. "We interpret the delay to mean that Microsoft is determined to produce a quality product."

    Microsoft does want to produce a quality database platform. Many customers don't know that Microsoft rolls out one of the SQL Server final betas to its internal production systems. In addition, several customers will roll out the beta in production as part of the technical adopter program (TAP) before SQL Server 2005 is released to the public. In other words, Microsoft and several large customers will be running their businesses on SQL Server 2005 before the commercial release.

    On one hand, readers want a quality product. On the other hand, readers agree that the reasons behind the delay stem more from Microsoft's ambition to add certain new functions than from quality issues. Many readers believe Microsoft is too concerned with developer-oriented features, such as Common Language Runtime (CLR) integration, rather than focusing on core data-management enhancements. From the responses I received, most readers agree that a release between SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 2005 that didn't contain the CLR but that featured enterprise data-management and T-SQL enhancements would have been a better strategy. One reader put it this way: "Microsoft continues to try and build an enterprise database server product and, at the same time, entertain the development community with 'shiny baubles' that make it nearly impossible for a DBA to keep a server up and running with four nines and three quarters of a million transactions per hour."

    Although that statement represents a typical DBA perspective, the developer world might feel differently. A developer might be willing to wait for the tighter integration with .NET. In my opinion, Microsoft is following a wise path by making aggressive moves to increase developer productivity within the database space. You can't have enterprise-class applications without highly reliable and scalable databases. At the same time, the database exists to serve applications (although DBAs sometimes forget that). Is the CLR good for SQL Server? Yes. Was focusing on developer needs in addition to DBA and core engine needs the right thing for Microsoft to do? Yes. Was the developer focus around .NET worth adding 1-3 years to SQL Server 2005's development cycle? No. But hindsight is 20/20.

    I talked with Tom Rizzo, Microsoft director of product management for SQL Server, about the SQL Server 2005 delay. Tom admitted that there was a lot more work involved in building the feature set for SQL Server 2005 than originally planned. In addition, the development team took a significant hiatus from SQL Server 2005 to go on a search-and-destroy mission for security vulnerabilities in SQL Server 2000. Tom agreed that a release between SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2000 might have been in Microsoft's--and its customers'-best interest. However, he was adamant that SQL Server 2005's rich feature set, including the developer enhancements, is the right long-term approach for the database world. "You don't make great strides in computing by taking tiny steps," Tom said. And I agree.

    Perhaps Microsoft should have anticipated a longer development time for SQL Server 2005 considering the number of features being introduced. But making a big leap in the database space is a good long-term strategy for Microsoft and its customers. As long as Microsoft ensures that the product will be reliable at ship time, I don't have a problem with the delay--and most of you agree.


    Sponsor: What's New in SQL Server 2005?

    SQL Server Magazine offers a library of helpful SQL Server expertise, article archives, endless code listings, valuable tips and an easy-to-use Web site that takes the word "timesaving" to an entirely different level. Our May 2004 issue is dedicated solely to SQL Server 2005, offering the inside scoop on what's new. Serving as just one example, each issue is packed with useful information that can be incorporated into your everyday work life. Subscribe today and experience the benefits of having a go-to SQL Server resource. Click here:
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    2. News and Views

  • Have Lunch with SQL Server Magazine

  • Are you attending SQL Server Magazine Connections in Orlando, Florida, April 18-21? If so, the editors of SQL Server Magazine would like to treat you to lunch and pick your brain. We are organizing a reader lunch to learn more about your responsibilities, challenges, resource needs, and how you use SQL Server Magazine, SQL Server Magazine UPDATE, and our Web site to help you do your jobs better and faster. The lunch will be Tuesday, April 20, at 11 a.m. Space is limited, so if you'd like to share your needs and help shape the direction of future content, please send an email today with your name, company name, email address, and daytime phone number to kathy@sqlmag.com. We look forward to seeing you in Orlando!

  • Microsoft Fixes Access-Violation Exception

  • When you configure an instance of SQL Server 2000 to use more than 16 processors on a multiprocessor computer and SQL Server runs many parallel query processing operations, an access-violation exception might occur. To see the SQL Server error log file that contains stack information similar to what you might notice when the access-violation exception occurs, read the Microsoft article "FIX: An access violation exception may occur when SQL Server runs many parallel query processing operations on a multiprocessor computer" at
         http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=836141

  • Hotfixes Available for T-SQL Errors

  • Microsoft released fixes for T-SQL errors associated with SELECT and DBCC CHECKCONSTRAINTS statements. When you run a T-SQL SELECT statement on a view that has many subqueries, you might receive an error message like "Server: Msg 8624, Level 16, State 21, Line 1 Internal SQL Server error." If you've received this error message, read the Microsoft article "FIX: You may receive an 'Internal SQL Server error' error message when you run a Transact-SQL SELECT statement on a view that has many subqueries in SQL Server 2000" at
         http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=830466

    When you log in to a SQL Server database by using the dbo user, then run the DBCC CHECKCONSTRAINTS T-SQL statement on a table owned by a user other than the dbo user, you might receive the following error message: "Server: Msg 208, Level 16, State 1, Line 1 Invalid object name ' '." If you've received this error message, read the Microsoft article "FIX: You may receive an 'Invalid object name...' error message when you run the DBCC CHECKCONSTRAINTS Transact-SQL statement on a table in SQL Server 2000" at
         http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=837970

  • Results of Previous Instant Poll: Active Directory

  • The voting has closed in SQL Server Magazine's Instant Poll for the question, "How much do you know about Active Directory?" Here are the results (+/- 1 percent) from the 288 votes:
    • 3% I'm an expert
    • 12% I know a lot about it
    • 28% I know enough to get by
    • 30% I'm a beginner
    • 27% I know nothing about it

  • New Instant Poll: SQL Server Experience

  • The next Instant Poll question is "How long have you worked with SQL Server?" Go to the SQL Server Magazine Web site and vote for 1) less than 1 year, 2) 1-3 years, 3) 3-6 years, 4) 6-9 years, or 5) 10 years—I'm a veteran.
         http://www.sqlmag.com

    3. Announcements

  • JSQL Server Experts, Tips, & Content

  • Visit the SQL Server Magazine Web site and access a library of valuable SQL Server information. Take advantage of the search box and navigation toolbars to access Web-exclusive articles, active forums, tips, archived articles, associated code, and more! The site features columns by such experts as Brian Moran and Itzik Ben-Gan. Click here:
         http://www.sqlmag.com

  • SQL Server Magazine Connections: Win a Harley

  • The SQL Server Magazine Connections conference will be held April 18-21 with concurrently running events Microsoft ASP.NET Connections and Visual Studio Connections. Register now and receive access to all three conferences for one low price, plus a chance to win a Harley. Register online or call 203-268-3204 or 800-438-6720.
         http://www.sqlconnections.com

    4. Resources

  • What's New in SQL Server Magazine: The Java Connection

  • Although the reality of "write once, run everywhere" portability might not quite live up to its promise, Java is a capable enterprise development language. Sun estimates there are 2 million Java developers, and not surprisingly, SQL Server isn't the database of choice for most of them. Microsoft has been slow to provide Java support for SQL Server, but that's beginning to change. In his April editorial "The Java Connection," Michael Otey explains how the availability of multiple JDBC drivers will help SQL Server compete head-to-head with Oracle and DB2 as an enterprise database for Java applications. Read this article today at
         http://www.sqlmag.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=41894

  • Hot Thread: Logon Failures in Reporting Services

  • Mwesch is getting the following error message when connecting to Reporting Services' report server: "The report server cannot open a connection to the report server database. The logon failed. (rsReportServerDatabaseLogonFailed) Get Online Help. Logon failure: unknown user name or bad password." But online Help just says to use the correct username and password. Do you know what account the report server uses to connect to SQL Server, or are you having similar problems? Offer your advice and see what other people have said on SQL Server Magazine's Reporting Services forum at
         http://www.winnetmag.com/sqlserver/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=1741&threadid=118899

  • Tip: Installing SQL Server 2000 on Windows Server 2003

  • by Brian Moran

    Q. I want to install SQL Server 2000 on Windows Server 2003, but when I do, I receive the error message "SQL Server 2000 SP2 and below isn't supported by this version of Windows. To run the program, click Continue. For more information, click Details." I don't have an installed version of SQL Server 2000 that already has Service Pack 3 (SP3) applied, and I can't install SP3 until I apply SQL Server. How can I install SQL Server 2000 on Windows Server 2003 when the OS doesn't support this release?

    A. The error message you're seeing has confused many people. Windows Server 2003 doesn't support SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 2 (SP2) and earlier, but you can install those releases. Immediately apply SP3 (or SP3a) once you've finished the installation. The error message can create a problem if you're trying to perform an unattended installation of SQL Server 2000 because insuppressible GUI messages don't cooperate with unattended installations. However, the Microsoft article "INF: How to Suppress the Appshelp Message in an Unattended Installation" provides a walk-through of registry key changes you can make to disable the error message. Disabling the error message will let an unattended installation proceed without problems. Microsoft has talked about shipping versions of SQL Server 2000 that have SP3a slip-streamed into the core SQL Server installation. However, those versions weren't available when I wrote this answer.

    5. Events Central


    For a complete guide to Web and live events, see
       http://www.winnetmag.com/events

  • Meta-Data/DAMA Conference, Los Angeles, May 2-6

  • Whether you use SQL Server, Oracle or DB2, success depends on good architecture. Hear from 120 speakers, covering metadata, enterprise architecture, data and process modeling, unstructured data, business rules, integration, XML, business intelligence, data warehousing, including 40 user case studies. Register today for the world's largest vendor-neutral data management conference.
         http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BGxw0AL

  • SQL Web Seminar—Writing and Debugging Great Stored Procedures

  • Well-written stored procedures can go a long way toward helping your project be successful. Join speaker Wayne Snyder (SQL Server MVP) on April 7 for a free, 1-hour Web Seminar, sponsored by LearnKey. You'll learn a useful debugging technique and the most common reason for wildly changing stored procedure responses. Register today for a chance to win an Apple iPod!
         http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BGxx0AM

    6. New and Improved


    (contributed by Dawn Cyr, products@sqlmag.com)

  • Quickly Create Reports in Multiple Formats

  • DTM Soft announced DTM Schema Reporter, a reporting tool for database schema that lets technical writers and DBAs quickly create reports of any complexity. The tool, which works with SQL Server, Oracle, and Interbase platforms, can create reports in multiple formats including RTF, HTML, or plain text. The product's primary and secondary report profile options let users select any level of report customization. DTM Schema Reporter also lets users create and save multiple report profiles to simplify data processing, alter table order in reports, and manually add annotations to individual tables. DTM Schema Reporter costs $99 for a single copy. To download a free demonstration copy or for more information, contact the company at support@sqledit.com or visit DTM Soft's Web site.
         http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BGxy0AN

  • Create a Web Interface for Your SQL Server Database

  • XLineSoft announced ASPRunner Professional, software that lets you Web-enable your SQL Server, Microsoft Access, Oracle, IBM DB2, or MySQL database. The software uses Active Server Pages (ASP) to let you access and modify your ODBC data source. By using the product's wizard-like interface, you can search, sort, edit, delete, and add data across the Internet. Built-in templates let you create and customize ASP pages without writing any code. ASPRunner Professional costs $249, and a free evaluation version. For more information, contact XLineSoft at 703-585-8376.
         http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BGxz0AO

    Software FX
    Chart FX OLAP-.NET front-end OLAP for Visual Studio developers.
        http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BGx10AB

    DB Ghost for SQL Server
    Take control of your source code! Change management for SQL is here.
        http://lists.sqlmag.com/cgi-bin3/DM/y/efIT0FgQMn0BRZ0BEkO0AQ


    CONTACT US


    Here's how to reach us with your comments and questions:

    • About SQL Server Perspectives — brianm@sqlmag.com
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      (please mention the newsletter name in the subject line)
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    • About sponsoring SQL SERVER MAGAZINE UPDATE? — Kate Silvertooth (ksilvertooth@sqlmag.com

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